ALL SAINTS, TUCKINGMILL

ALL SAINTS, TUCKINGMILL

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THE HISTORY OF OUR CHURCH

The Ecclesiastical District of All Saints, Tuckingmill was gazetted by an Order in Council of 3rd June 1844, being a new Parish taken partly out of the ancient Parishes of Camborne and of Illogan, due to a large increase in the nineteenth century mining population centred on the village of Tuckingmill. This move came during the Episcopate at Exeter (for there was then no Diocese of Truro) of the redoubtable Henry Philpotts (1831 -1869) under whose aegis much new ground was broken in the cause of the Church in the West of England, many new Churches were built in Devon and Cornwall, All Saints being one of these.

The Foundation Stone of the new Church was laid in 1844, the architect being a Mr. J. Haward of Exeter who built in a Romanesque or Norman style; quite unusual for a period when the Gothic Revival was sweeping England, hand in hand with the Oxford Movement and a new appreciation of things Medieval. The Building was consecrated by the Lord Bishop of Exeter on Monday July 7th 1845, along with the accompanying Burial Ground, the Royal Cornwall Gazette noting that “The sermon was preached by the Rev. J. Punnet, of St. Erth, from the 10th Chap, of Numbers, and part of the 29th verse: Come thou with us and we will do thee good.” This building is also a mark of the Right Hon. Lady Basset’s liberality. On the previous Saturday the Bishop had laid the corner stone of the new Parish Church for Illogan, as part of an Episcopal Visitation of the District as well as Confirming some 300 children from Camborne, Illogan, Redruth and Gwennap Parishes in this same week-end.

The post-war years have brought some changes, as well as new hopes and visions for the future. It is encouraging to note that in 1971 the number of names in the Electoral Roll (138) was greater than that of 1939 (122). Today the Church still keeps up a long and fine Musical Tradition while Sunday morning worship is well attended. The oak Chancel Screen has gone, falling victim to insect infestation, while the new All Souls Chapel was created in the south aisle to the west of the organ, in about 1970 with accompanying Aumbrey given by the late Lord Bishop of Truro, Dr. J.M. Key. A central Nave altar for the Eucharist, and the recent return of the Choir Stalls to the Chancel have been recent re-orderings in a Church which is always open daily for private prayer and meditation.

 

History and images courtesy of David Thomas.

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